Learn how to get more involved with the ala kahakai trail association!

We encourage you to contact us and join our email listing to receive monthly updates on the activities we have prepared for this year. 

 
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Nana i waele mua i ke ala, mahope aku mākou, nā pōkiʻi.

He [or she] first cleared the path and then we younger ones followed.

As a community, it is important to remember that the trails were created by our kupuna (elders) and thereby exist today for our benefit and use. This is one of many reasons why it is important that we constantly strive to protect and care for the trail systems here on Hawaiʻi Island. The trail was built and maintained by our people for generations. However, this responsibility is not a burden, it is a privilege. We often forget the trails in our every day lives, as they are hidden from plain sight. Nonetheless, every time we walk in the physical space that our kupuna lived and breathed, we are reminded of the privilege that we have been given. This is the kuleana that we at the Ala Kahakai Trail Association hope to reconnect and maintain the connections to for moʻopuna of those who came before us and never left.

Waimea Middle School seventh graders on the trail crossing Waiʻulaʻula.   We were fortunate to host this Waimea Middle School seventh grade class as they explored the connections between Mauka and Makai, Ahupuaʻa and of course, Trails. There is no limit to the learning that takes place in a classroom with no walls and these students were able to expand beyond the physical trails, exploring the connectivity of ʻaina and kupuna.

Waimea Middle School seventh graders on the trail crossing Waiʻulaʻula.

We were fortunate to host this Waimea Middle School seventh grade class as they explored the connections between Mauka and Makai, Ahupuaʻa and of course, Trails. There is no limit to the learning that takes place in a classroom with no walls and these students were able to expand beyond the physical trails, exploring the connectivity of ʻaina and kupuna.

 
 
The hike from Punaluʻu to Kawa, Kaʻu was full of opportunities to learn and share manaʻo of place and we at the Trail Association are so grateful to have been able to spend time with our Kaʻu ʻOhana. Mahalo piha to them all for welcoming us into their home.

The hike from Punaluʻu to Kawa, Kaʻu was full of opportunities to learn and share manaʻo of place and we at the Trail Association are so grateful to have been able to spend time with our Kaʻu ʻOhana. Mahalo piha to them all for welcoming us into their home.

 
Mahalo to the NPS trail crew for assisting the South Kona team in their efforts of trail clearing at Kauleoli! ʻAʻohe hana nui ke alu ʻia!  No task is to big when done together by all!

Mahalo to the NPS trail crew for assisting the South Kona team in their efforts of trail clearing at Kauleoli! ʻAʻohe hana nui ke alu ʻia! No task is to big when done together by all!

Beach clean ups with Keep Puako Beautiful!

The view extending into the ocean at Honokaʻope can be seen from the Ala Kahakai and restoration efforts by the National Park Service (NPS) have made this National Historic Trail much more accessible on the cliffside. Portions of the trail were redirected inland for safer travels by hikers. Mahalo nui to the NPS Trail Crew for all their hardwork in maintaining and restoring this trail!

The view extending into the ocean at Honokaʻope can be seen from the Ala Kahakai and restoration efforts by the National Park Service (NPS) have made this National Historic Trail much more accessible on the cliffside. Portions of the trail were redirected inland for safer travels by hikers. Mahalo nui to the NPS Trail Crew for all their hardwork in maintaining and restoring this trail!

ATA Board Member Keoni Fox speaks to community members about the ongoing preservation work being done in the Kaʻu district.   We look forward to next year at the Kaʻu Coffee Festival! Thank you to all of those who were able to come visit our booth and a huge mahalo nunui to all who signed their names in support of the land acquisition of Kaunamano and Manakaʻa Fishing Village. The Trust for Public Land, Ka‘u community members and groups are partnering with Ala Kahakai Trail Association and the National Park Service to protect Kaunamano and Manakaʻa as living legacies of Ka‘u.

ATA Board Member Keoni Fox speaks to community members about the ongoing preservation work being done in the Kaʻu district.

We look forward to next year at the Kaʻu Coffee Festival! Thank you to all of those who were able to come visit our booth and a huge mahalo nunui to all who signed their names in support of the land acquisition of Kaunamano and Manakaʻa Fishing Village. The Trust for Public Land, Ka‘u community members and groups are partnering with Ala Kahakai Trail Association and the National Park Service to protect Kaunamano and Manakaʻa as living legacies of Ka‘u.

Kaunamano, Kaʻu (Photo Credit: Trust for Public Land)   If you are interested in supporting this acquisition or have any questions or concerns, please contact fox@alakahakaitrail.org or fill out the form below.

Kaunamano, Kaʻu (Photo Credit: Trust for Public Land)

If you are interested in supporting this acquisition or have any questions or concerns, please contact fox@alakahakaitrail.org or fill out the form below.

Statement of Support to Protect Manakaʻa Fishing Village and Kaunamano, Kaʻu

Name *
Name
Phone
Phone
Hawaiʻi Community College students joined us for a hike from Weliweli to Wainanaliʻi and back on February 23, 2019. An amazing group! Mahalo!

Hawaiʻi Community College students joined us for a hike from Weliweli to Wainanaliʻi and back on February 23, 2019. An amazing group! Mahalo!

The 1871 trail south of Puʻu Honua o Honaunau National Historic Park.

The 1871 trail south of Puʻu Honua o Honaunau National Historic Park.

Community Members hike from Punaluʻu to Kawa, Kaʻu with Ala Kahakai Trail Association.

Community Members hike from Punaluʻu to Kawa, Kaʻu with Ala Kahakai Trail Association.


INterested in getting more involved?

The Ala Kahakai Trail Association will be hosting a community hike along the trail once a month. These events are an amazing opportunity to learn about significant archaeological, historical, and cultural information about the wahi pana of Hawaiʻi Island.

Please contact crivello@alakahakaitrail.org if you are interested in receiving updates on when and where these hiking events will take place.


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